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Social Inequalities in early childhood health and development, evidence and policy implications

Creator:

Pikhart, H., Ruiz, M., Norrison, J., Goldblatt, P. and Marmot, M.

Subject Keywords: Social Inequality, Child Health, Child Development, Unequal, Social Disadvantage
Topic: Health Inequalities
Health Inequalities
Type: Report
Region: Europe
Description:

The research for Work Package 2 of DRIVERS (“Addressing the strategic Determinants to Reduce health Inequality Via 1) Early childhood development, 2) Realising fair employment, and 3) Social protection”) focused on the scientific evidence for both the effect of social determinants on health and development in early childhood and effective interventions to reduce inequalities. This report addresses the three objectives of this Work Package, namely:

1. To conduct a systematic review on social inequalities, early child development and early child health;

2. To analyse and develop methodologies for interventions regarding unequal child development and health;

3. To provide analytic evidence using data from WHO - Europe member countries that helps to explain social inequalities in early child development and early child health, and identifies factors that would reduce health inequalities across the European region.

In the introductory sections we provide an overview of the background to this project and outline the theoretical framework used in this Work Package.

The first objective of the Work Package was accomplished by conducting a systematic review of the main findings of 201 studies from 32 countries in the European region on social inequalities in early child development and early child health. We demonstrate that multiple adverse social factors operating at both the household and neighbourhood level are independently associated with a range of adverse health and developmental outcomes throughout early childhood. The social gradient in health and developmental outcomes observed throughout the remaining life course may be partly explained by gradients initiated in early childhood, suggesting that prevention and early intervention are effective strategies to tackle the complex embedding, clustering and cumulative nature of social disadvantage in early life.

 

Date:

01/09/2014

Rights: © The Authors
Suggested citation:

Pikhart, H., Ruiz, M., Norrison, J., Goldblatt, P. and Marmot, M.. (2014) Social Inequalities in early childhood health and development, evidence and policy implications [Online]. Available from: http://publichealthwell.ie/node/837828 [Accessed: 21st September 2019].

  

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