menu ☰
menu ˟

Psychosocial treatment for opiate abuse and dependence

Creator:

Mayet, S., Farrell, M., Ferri, M. M. F., Amato, L. and Davoli, M.

Subject Keywords: Review of whether psychosocial treatments alone are adequate to treat people with opiate abuse and dependence.
Topic: Chronic Conditions
Type: Article
Region: International (other)
Description:

Substance dependence is a social and public health problem; therefore it is a priority to develop effective treatments. Previous Cochrane reviews have explored the efficacy of pharmacotherapy for opiate dependence. This current review focuses on the role of psychosocial interventions alone for the treatment of opiate dependence. There is some evidence for the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions, but no systematic review has even been carried out. Objectives To assess the efficacy and acceptability of psychosocial interventions alone for treating opiate use disorders. Randomised controlled trials comparing psychosocial interventions alone versus pharmacological interventions or placebo or non-intervention for treating opioid use disorders were undertaken. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Five trials involving 389 participants were included. These analysed Contingency Management, Brief Reinforcement Based Intensive Outpatient Therapy coupled with Contingency Management, Cue Exposure therapy, Alternative Program for Methadone Maintenance Treatment Program Drop-outs (MMTP) and Enhanced Outreach-Counselling Program. All the treatments were studied against the control (standard) treatment; therefore it was not possible to identify which type of psychosocial therapy was most effective. Both Enhanced Outreach Counselling and Brief Reinforcement Based Intensive Outpatient Therapy coupled with Contingency Management had significantly better outcomes than standard therapy regarding relapse to opioid use, re-enrolment in treatment and retention in treatment. At 1-month and 3- month follow up the effects of Reinforcement Based Intensive Outpatient Therapy were not sustained. There was no further follow up of the Enhanced Outreach Counselling group. The Alternative Program for MMTP Drop-outs and the behavioural therapies of Cue Exposure and Contingency Management alone were no better than the control. As the studies were heterogeneous, it was not possible to pool the results and perform a meta-analysis.

Date:

18/10/2004

Rights: © The Cochrane Collaboration
Suggested citation:

Mayet, S., Farrell, M., Ferri, M. M. F., Amato, L. and Davoli, M.. (2004) Psychosocial treatment for opiate abuse and dependence [Online]. Available from: http://publichealthwell.ie/node/4440 [Accessed: 23rd July 2019].

  

View your saved citations and reading lists

Contributor:

Other partner websites
 
Click here to view all the resources gathered from this organisation's website.