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Interventions for improving communication with children and adolescents about their cancer

Creator:

Ranmal, R., Prictor, M. and Scott, J. T.

Subject Keywords: CANCER, COMMUNICATION, YOUNG PEOPLE
Set: Cancer
Causes
Chronic Conditions
Conditions
Management
Mental Health
Prevention
Type: Report
Region: International (other)
Description:

Communication with children and adolescents with cancer about their disease and treatment and the implications of these is an important aspect of good quality care. It is often poorly performed in practice. Various interventions have been developed that aim to enhance communication involving children or adolescents with cancer. Objectives To assess the effects of interventions for improving communication with children and/or adolescents about their cancer, its treatment and their implications, updating the 2003 version of this review. Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, and before and after studies, evaluating the effects of interventions for improving communication with children and/or adolescents about their cancer, treatment and related issues were used. One new study met the criteria for inclusion; in total ten studies have been included involving 438 participants. Studies were diverse in terms of the interventions evaluated, study designs used, types of people who participated and the outcomes measured. One study of a computer-assisted education programme reported improvements in knowledge and understanding about blood counts and cancer symptoms. One study of a CD-ROM about leukaemia reported an improvement in children's feelings of control over their health. One study of art therapy as support for children during painful procedures reported an increase in positive, collaborative behaviour. Two out of two studies of school reintegration programs reported improvements in some aspects of psychosocial wellbeing (one in anxiety and one in depression), social wellbeing (two in social competence and one in social support) and behavioural problems; and one reported improvements in physical competence. One newly-identified study of a multifaceted interactive intervention reported a reduction in distress (as measured by heart rate) related to radiation therapy. Two studies of group therapy, one of planned play and story telling, and one of a self-care coping intervention, found no significant effects on the psychological or clinical outcomes measured.

Date:

08/10/2008

Rights: © The Cochrane Collaboration
Suggested citation:

Ranmal, R., Prictor, M. and Scott, J. T.. (2008) Interventions for improving communication with children and adolescents about their cancer [Online]. Available from: http://www.thehealthwell.info/node/4390 [Accessed: 24th September 2017].

  

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