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Impact of minimum price per unit of alcohol on patients with liver disease in UK.

Creator:

Nick Sheron, Fern Chilcott, Laura Matthews, Ben Challoner, Maria Thomas

Catalogue: Research and Evaluation
Report
Type: Report
Region: Republic of Ireland
Northern Ireland
Description:

The slow epidemic of liver disease in the UK over the last 30 years is a result of increased consumption of strong cheap alcohol. When we examined alcohol consumption in 404 subjects with a range of liver disease, we confirmed that patients with alcohol-related cirrhosis drank huge amounts of cheap alcohol, with a mean weekly consumption of 146 units in men and 142 in women at a median price of 33p/unit compared with £1.10 for low-risk drinkers. For the patients in our study, the impact of a minimum unit price of 50p/unit on spending on alcohol would be 200 times higher for patients with liver disease who were drinking at harmful levels than for low-risk drinkers. As a health policy, a minimum unit price for alcohol is exquisitely targeted at the heaviest drinkers, for whom the impact of alcohol-related illness is most devastating.

Date:

01/01/2014

Rights: Public
Suggested citation:

Nick Sheron, Fern Chilcott, Laura Matthews, Ben Challoner, Maria Thomas. (2014) Impact of minimum price per unit of alcohol on patients with liver disease in UK. [Online]. Available from: http://publichealthwell.ie/node/796977 [Accessed: 15th September 2019].

  

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Contributor:

National Drugs Library
 
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