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Effect of a voluntary food fortification policy on folate, related B vitamin status, and homocysteine in healthy adults.

Creator:

<span id="thmr_129" class="thmr_call"> MOLLOY, ANNE MARIE</span> ; <span id="thmr_130" class="thmr_call"> SCOTT, JOHN MARTIN</span> ;

Subject Keywords: <span id="thmr_77" class="thmr_call"> Food fortification • folate • folic acid • plasma homocysteine • B vitamins • intakes • biomarkers • dietary folate equivalents • adults</span> ;
Catalogue: Research and Evaluation
Report
Type: Article
Region: Republic of Ireland
Description:

Background: Mandatory folic acid fortification of food is effective in reducing neural tube defects and may even reduce stroke-related mortality, but it remains controversial because of concerns about potential adverse effects. Thus, it is virtually nonexistent in Europe, albeit many countries allow food fortification on a voluntary basis.

Objective: The objective of the study was to examine the effect of a voluntary but liberal food fortification policy on dietary intake and biomarker status of folate and other homocysteine-related B vitamins in a healthy population.

Design: The study was a cross-sectional study. From a convenience sample of 662 adults in Northern Ireland, those who provided a fasting blood sample and dietary intake data were examined (n = 441, aged 18–92 y). Intakes of both natural food folate and folic acid from fortified foods were estimated; we used the latter to categorize participants by fortified food intake.

Results: Fortified foods were associated with significantly higher dietary intakes and biomarker status of folate, vitamin B-12, vitamin B-6, and riboflavin than were unfortified foods. There was no difference in natural food folate intake (range: 179–197 µg/d) between the fortified food categories. Red blood cell folate concentrations were 387 nmol/L higher and plasma total homocysteine concentrations were 2 µmol/L lower in the group with the highest fortified food intake (median intake: 208 µg/d folic acid) than in the nonconsumers of fortified foods (0 µg/d folic acid).

Conclusions: These results show that voluntary food fortification is associated with a substantial increase in dietary intake and biomarker status of folate and metabolically related B vitamins with potential beneficial effects on health. However, those who do not consume fortified foods regularly may have insufficient B vitamin status to achieve the known and potential health benefits.

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Rights: © Public
Suggested citation:

<span id="thmr_129" class="thmr_call"> MOLLOY, ANNE MARIE</span> ; <span id="thmr_130" class="thmr_call"> SCOTT, JOHN MARTIN</span> ; . () Effect of a voluntary food fortification policy on folate, related B vitamin status, and homocysteine in healthy adults. [Online]. Available from: http://www.thehealthwell.info/node/624427 [Accessed: 15th December 2017].

  

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