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A cost-effectiveness analysis of school-based suicide prevention programmes.

Creator:

Susan Ahern, Lee Ann Burke, Brendan McElroy, Paul Corcoran, Elaine M McMahon, Helen Keeley, Vladimir Carli, Camilla Wasserman, Christina W Hoven, Marco Sarchiapone, Alan Apter, Judit A Balazs, Raphaela Banzer, Julio Bobes, Romuald Brunner, Doina Cosman, Christian Haring, Michael Kaess, Jean Pierre Kahn, Agnes Kereszteny, Vita Postuvan, Pilar A Saiz, Peeter Varnik, Danuta Wasserman

Type: Article
Region: Europe
Description:

Suicide is one of the leading causes of death among young people globally. In light of emerging evidence supporting the effectiveness of school-based suicide prevention programmes, an analysis of cost-effectiveness is required. We aimed to conduct a full cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of the large pan-European school-based RCT, Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE). The health outcomes of interest were suicide attempt and severe suicidal ideation with suicide plans. Adopting a payerâ?Ts perspective, three suicide prevention interventions were modelled with a Control over a 12-month time period. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) indicate that the Youth Aware of Mental Health (YAM) programme has the lowest incremental cost per 1% point reduction in incident for both outcomes and per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained versus the Control. The ICERs reported for YAM were â,¬34.83 and â,¬45.42 per 1% point reduction in incident suicide attempt and incident severe suicidal ideation, respectively, and a cost per QALY gained of â,¬47,017 for suicide attempt and â,¬48,216 for severe suicidal ideation. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves were used to examine uncertainty in the QALY analysis, where cost-effectiveness probabilities were calculated using net monetary benefit analysis incorporating a two-stage bootstrapping technique. For suicide attempt, the probability that YAM was cost-effective at a willingness to pay of â,¬47,000 was 39%. For severe suicidal ideation, the probability that YAM was cost-effective at a willingness to pay of â,¬48,000 was 43%. This CEA supports YAM as the most cost-effective of the SEYLE interventions in preventing both a suicide attempt and severe suicidal ideation.

Date:

01/02/2018

Rights: Public
Suggested citation:

Susan Ahern, Lee Ann Burke, Brendan McElroy, Paul Corcoran, Elaine M McMahon, Helen Keeley, Vladimir Carli, Camilla Wasserman, Christina W Hoven, Marco Sarchiapone, Alan Apter, Judit A Balazs, Raphaela Banzer, Julio Bobes, Romuald Brunner, Doina Cosman, Christian Haring, Michael Kaess, Jean Pierre Kahn, Agnes Kereszteny, Vita Postuvan, Pilar A Saiz, Peeter Varnik, Danuta Wasserman. (2018) A cost-effectiveness analysis of school-based suicide prevention programmes. [Online]. Available from: http://publichealthwell.ie/node/1146294 [Accessed: 26th June 2019].

  

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National Drugs Library
 
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