menu ☰
menu ˟

Full Dementia UK report

Creator:

prepared by the Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU) at the London School of Economics and the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London, for the Alzheimer's Society

Type: Report
Region: Republic of Ireland
Northern Ireland
Description:

A report into the prevalence and cost of dementia prepared by the Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU) at the London School of Economics and the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London, for the Alzheimer’s Society.The term ‘dementia’ is used to describe a collection of symptoms, including a decline in memory, reasoning and communication skills, and a gradual loss of skills needed to carry out daily activities. These symptoms are caused by structural and chemical changes in the brain as a result of physical diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. Dementia can affect people of any age, but is most common in older people. One in six people over 80 has a form of dementia and one in 14 people over 65 has a form of dementia. Researchers are still working to find out more about the different types of dementia, and whether any have a genetic link. It is thought that many factors, including age, genetic background, medical history and lifestyle, can combine to lead to the onset of dementia. Dementia is a progressive condition. This means that the symptoms become more severe over time. Understanding how this progression happens can be useful in helping someone with dementia anticipate and plan for change.  

Date:

03/12/2008

Rights: Public
Suggested citation:

prepared by the Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU) at the London School of Economics and the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London, for the Alzheimer's Society. (2008) Full Dementia UK report [Online]. Available from: http://publichealthwell.ie/node/8905 [Accessed: 26th August 2019].

  

View your saved citations and reading lists

Contributor:

CARDI
 
Click here to view all the resources gathered from this organisation's website.